Park 56 Podiatry
120 E 56th St, Suite 940
New York, NY 10022

(212) 980-6487

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Monday, 27 August 2018 00:00

What Can I Do To Help My Flat Feet?

The middle part of the foot typically consists of a curved structure known as the arch. For patients who have flat feet, the arch is absent and the foot lies completely flat on the ground. In babies, the arches are not always visible and will become more apparent as the child ages. Certain people may experience pain in the feet and ankles as a result of having flat feet. Additionally, shoes may wear out faster than the average person, because of the inward rolling that may occur. The bones and muscles in the feet may become weaker as well, which may affect the overall health of the body. Research has shown there may be several causes of fallen arches, including rheumatoid arthritis, obesity, or muscle and nerve conditions such as cerebral palsy. Moderate relief may be found in wearing shoes that fit well and offer adequate support, in addition to performing mild stretching techniques that may aid in strengthening the muscles and surrounding ligaments and tendons. It’s strongly advised to consult with a podiatrist if you are afflicted with flat feet and would like additional information about treatment options.

Flatfoot

Flatfoot is a condition that occurs when the arches on the foot are flattened, which allows the soles of the feet to touch the floor. Flatfoot is a common condition and it is usually painless.

Throughout childhood, most people begin to develop arches in their feet, however, some do not. Those who do not develop arches are left with flatfoot. The pain associated with flat feet is usually at its worse when engaging in activity. Another symptom that may occur with those who have this condition is swelling along the inside of the ankle.

It is also possible to have flexible flatfoot. Flexible flatfoot occurs when the arch is visible while sitting or standing on the tiptoes, but it disappears when standing. People who have flexible flatfoot are often children and most outgrow it without any problems.

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop flatfoot. Those who have diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis have an increased risk of flatfoot development. Other factors include aging and obesity.

Diagnosis for flat feet is usually done by a series of tests by your podiatrist. Your podiatrist will typically try an x-ray, CT scan, ultrasound, or MRI on the feet. Treatment is usually not necessary for flat foot unless it causes pain. However, therapy is often used for those who experience pain in their flat feet. Some other suggested treatment options are arch supports, stretching exercises, and supportive shoes. 

Read more about Flatfoot

If you have ever experienced a corn on the top of the toes, you most likely are aware of the pain that is associated with it. Corns are generally the result of increased pressure and rubbing, and typically originates from shoes that do not fit correctly. It appears to be a small area, and the skin will be hardened and thick. There are known to be two types of corns and are referred to as hard and soft corns. The latter generally develops in between the toes and are often soft, because of the excess moisture and sweat that is present. Hard corns come from wearing shoes that are too tight and may often cause the toes to endure unwanted pressure, resulting in pain and discomfort. There are different types of treatments that may be used to eliminate corns, and it’s advised to speak with a podiatrist for possible relief options that are correct for you.

If you have any concerns regarding your feet and ankles, contact one of our podiatrists of Park 56 Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What are they? And how do you get rid of them?
Corns can be described as areas of the skin that have thickened to the point of becoming painful or irritating. They are often layers and layers of the skin that have become dry and rough, and are normally smaller than calluses.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as wearing:

  • Well-fitting socks
  • Comfortable shoes that are not tight around your foot
  • Shoes that offer support

Treating Corns
Treatment of corns involves removing the dead skin that has built up in the specific area of the foot. Consult with Our doctors to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses

If you have gout, it is more than likely that your diet contains more purine than what is necessary. If you fail to take action against the amount of purine in your body, your kidney function will become disrupted. Purine is a substance that, when broken down, creates uric acid, which is filtered by the kidneys. A balanced amount of uric acid will help regulate blood throughout the body by promoting healthy blood vessel linings. When there is an excessive amount of uric acid in the bloodstream, urate crystals gather in the joints, which creates a condition called gout. If you are looking to avoid developing gout, you should avoid foods that are high in purines such as animal organs, sardines, alcohol, and yeast. Foods that contain a moderate amount of purine are oatmeal, bacon, oyster, spinach, sausage, and shrimp. Foods that are low in purine are rice, pasta, tofu, peanut butter, low-fat dairy products, and green olives. Research has shown that there is an inverse relationship with uric acid levels and the amount of low-fat dairy products consumed. It is important that you carefully plan your diet if you are aiming to prevent the development of gout.

Gout is a painful condition that can be treated. If you are seeking treatment, contact one of our podiatrists from Park 56 Podiatry. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What is Gout?

Gout is a form of arthritis that is characterized by sudden, severe attacks of pain, redness, and tenderness in the joints. The condition usually affects the joint at the base of the big toe. A gout attack can occur at any random time, such as the middle of the night while you are asleep.

Symptoms

  • Intense Joint Pain - Usually around the large joint of your big toe, and it most severe within the first four to twelve hours
  • Lingering Discomfort - Joint discomfort may last from a few days to a few weeks
  • Inflammation and Redness -Affected joints may become swollen, tender, warm and red
  • Limited Range of Motion - May experience a decrease in joint mobility

Risk Factors

  • Genetics - If family members have gout, you’re more likely to have it
  • Medications - Diuretic medications can raise uric acid levels
  • Gender/Age - Gout is more common in men until the age of 60. It is believed that estrogen protects women until that point
  • Diet - Eating red meat and shellfish increases your risk
  • Alcohol - Having more than two alcoholic drinks per day increases your risk
  • Obesity - Obese people are at a higher risk for gout

Prior to visiting your podiatrist to receive treatment for gout, there are a few things you should do beforehand. If you have gout you should write down your symptoms--including when they started and how often you experience them, important medical information you may have, and any questions you may have. Writing down these three things will help your podiatrist in assessing your specific situation so that he or she may provide the best route of treatment for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Gout
Monday, 06 August 2018 00:00

Warning Signs for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a condition that affects over 40 million Americans. Unfortunately, many people brush off their RA symptoms as less severe injuries. Many people with RA in their feet, notice the feeling of stiffness when they wake up in the morning. If you are suffering from rheumatoid arthritis, you may even start to notice joint stiffness throughout the day. Another common symptom is joint swelling due to inflammation. Those with arthritis will also notice pain in their joints that can potentially make walking difficult. Often, this pain appears when you are not putting the joints to use. If you suspect you have rheumatoid arthritis in your feet, you should make an appointment with your podiatrist to seek treatment immediately.

Because RA affects more than just your joints, including the joints in your feet and ankles, it is important to seek early diagnosis from your podiatrist  if you feel like the pain in your feet might be caused by RA. For more information, contact one of our podiatrists of Park 56 Podiatry. Our doctors will assist you with all of your podiatric concerns.

What Is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks the membranes surrounding the joints. Inflammation of the lining and eventually the destruction of the joint’s cartilage and bone occur, causing severe pain and immobility.

Rheumatoid Arthritis of the Feet

Although RA usually attacks multiple bones and joints throughout the entire body, almost 90 percent of cases result in pain in the foot or ankle area.

Symptoms

  • Swelling and pain in the feet
  • Stiffness in the feet
  • Pain on the ball or sole of feet
  • Joint shift and deformation

Diagnosis

Quick diagnosis of RA in the feet is important so that the podiatrist can treat the area effectively. Your doctor will ask you about your medical history, occupation, and lifestyle to determine the origin of the condition. Rheumatoid Factor tests help to determine if someone is affected by the disease.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Midtown, Manhattan. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Rheumatoid Arthritis in the Feet
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